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Itraconazole for Veterinary Use

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by Barbara Forney, VMD

Overview

Therapeutic Class:  Triazole Antifungal

Species:  Horses

May Be Prescribed by Vets for:
Ulcerative keratomycosis.

Basic Information

Itraconazole is a triazole antifungal drug that is used to treat systemic fungal infections of dogs, cats and humans. It also is used topically to treat ulcerative keratomycosis of horses. Triazoles are a subgroup of the azole group of drugs. These drugs are fungistatic at the concentrations used systemically and fungicidal at the concentrations that may be achieved topically.

Itraconazole is effective against a filamentous fungi , dimorphic fungi and yeasts. The mechanism of action is through the disruption of the oxidative enzymes of the fungal organism.

Horses

Topical itraconazole has been shown to be effective to treat ulcerative keratomycosis. It is particularly effective against aspergillus, one of the more-common fungal pathogens. The ophthalmic preparation of itraconazole contains 1% itraconazole, 30% DMSO and artificial tears. This formulation is necessary because itraconazole is relatively insoluble in water.

Therapy for ulcerative keratomycosis needs to be quite aggressive. Many clinicians recommend topical treatment every two hours. Some animals with particularly difficult cases of ulcerative keratomycosis also may be treated systemically with oral itraconazole or oral lufenuron.

Itraconazole Side Effects

Uveitis may increase after the first day of therapy because of inflammation due to fungal death.

Precautions

DMSO may be topically irritating in some horses.

Drug Interactions

Corticosteroids generally are contraindicated in cases of ulcerative keratomycosis. No drug interactions per se were found.

Overdose

No information regarding overdose was found in the literature. Itraconazole is one of the less toxic azole drugs.


About the Author

Dr. Barbara Forney is a veterinary practitioner in Chester County, Pennsylvania. She has a master's degree in animal science from the University of Delaware and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in 1982.

She began to develop her interest in client education and medical writing in 1997. Recent publications include portions of The Pill Book Guide to Medication for Your Dog and Cat, and most recently Understanding Equine Medications published by the Bloodhorse.

Dr. Forney is an FEI veterinarian and an active member of the AAEP, AVMA, and AMWA.

The information contained on this site is general in nature and is intended for use as an informational aid. It does not cover all possible uses, actions, precautions, side effects, or interactions of the products shown, nor is the information intended as medical advice or diagnosis for individual health problems or for making an evaluation as to the risks and benefits of using a particular product. You should consult your doctor about diagnosis and treatment of any health problems. Information and statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA"), nor has the FDA approved the products to diagnose, cure or prevent disease.

Wedgewood Pharmacy's compounded veterinary preparations are not intended for use in food and food-producing animals.
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